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Last updated: 1/10/2014 6:19:34 PM
2013-2014 ILSP Speaker Series - NAFTA: 20 Years Later - California Western
2013-2014 ILSP Speaker Series
NAFTA: 20 Years Later

2013-2014 ILSP Speaker Series - NAFTA: 20 Years Later

 

Speakers

October 30, 2013
Kevin O'Reilly
Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs
U.S. State Department

"The Legacy of NAFTA and U.S. Foreign Policy"
12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
California Western School of Law
Classroom 2C


January 24, 2014
The Hon. William C. Graham
Former Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of Defence of Canada

"NAFTA, Free Trade and the Americas: The Canadian Perspective"
12:15 p.m. - 1:25 p.m.
California Western School of Law
Lecture Hall 1


March 6, 2014
Clare Seelke
Specialist in Latin American Affairs
Congressional Research Service

"Bilateral Cooperation on Security and Migration"
in partnership with the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies symposium, "Mexico Moving Forward"
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
UC San Diego
Sanford Consortium Auditorium


March 12, 2014
Robert Blecker
Professor of Economics
American University

"The Mexican and U.S. Economies: Twenty Years after NAFTA and Six Years after the Crisis"
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
UC San Diego
Eleanor Roosevelt College Admin. Building
Room 115

NAFTA: 20 Years Later

On January 1, 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the seminal regional trade pact among Canada, Mexico, and the United States, entered into force.

On that same day, a group of indigenous peoples in Chiapas began the Zapatista uprising in Mexico, challenging the liberalization that NAFTA represented.

NAFTA was designed to integrate the economies of the three countries, and it was expected to have profound implications on security, immigration patterns, and economic growth.

To the concern of its critics, NAFTA has now become the template for future regional and bilateral free trade agreements.

Twenty years later, NAFTA has changed the face of trade in the Americas. While it has promoted economic liberalization, NAFTA has also contributed to unprecedented social dislocation in Mexico and the United States.

The 11th annual joint speaker series, co-sponsored by the Institute for International, Comparative and Area Studies at UC San Diego and the International Legal Studies Program at California Western School of Law, explores the contributions of NAFTA and the challenges it faces in the future.

View the Speaker Brochure