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Tamara Lave

Tamara Lave

Professor of Law, Miami University

Professor Lave is also a Criminal Justice Studies Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Her primary areas of research are campus sexual misconduct, the punishment and control of sex offenders, and more recently, policing. Tamara was the reporter for the ABA Criminal Justice Section Task Force on College Due Process Rights and Victim Protections. The Task Force’s report and recommendations were published on June 1, 2017 with the unanimous endorsement of the ABA Criminal Justice Section. Tamara is the co-editor of The Cambridge Handbook of Policing in the United States (2019, and she is currently writing a book on adjudicating campus sexual misconduct that will be published by Cambridge University Press. Tamara received the 2016 Mary E. Doyle Leadership Award from Miami Law Women and the 2018 Hausler Golden Apple Award. Before getting her PhD, Tamara was a deputy public defender in San Diego for ten years where she handled a variety of cases, including child molestation, rape, and murder. Tamara received her B.A. from Haverford College, her J.D. from Stanford University, and her PhD from University of California, Berkeley.
tlave@law.miami.edu

Kevin McMunigal

Kevin McMunigal

Professor of Law, Case Western Reserve University

Professor McMunigal teaches Criminal Law, Evidence and Professional Responsibility. He has held visiting appointments at the University of California (Hastings), Loyola Law School (Los Angeles), and Universidad Francisco Marroquin in Guatemala. He is the co-author of Criminal Law: A Contemporary Approach, a casebook published by Aspen Publishing and of Do No Wrong: Ethics for Prosecutors and Defenders, published by the American Bar Association. His recent work includes Investigative Deceit, published in the Hastings Law Journal, The (Lack) of Enforcement of Prosecutor Disclosure Rules, published in the Hofstra Law Review, and Defense Counsel and Plea Bargain Perjury, published in the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law. Professor McMunigal is currently guest editing a symposium issue of the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law on the ethics of client counseling.
kevin.mcmunigal@case.edu

Peter Joy

Peter A. Joy

Henry Hitchcock Professor of Law; Director, Criminal Justice Clinic, Washington University, St. Louis

Professor Joy is well known for his work in legal ethics, clinical legal education, criminal justice, and trial practice. As director of the Criminal Justice Clinic, he supervises student-lawyers who provide direct legal representation to clients and work with experienced public defenders on criminal matters. Professor Joy has written extensively and presented nationally and internationally on legal ethics, lawyer and judicial professionalism, clinical legal education, and access to justice issues. Professor Joy is a recipient of the Association of American Law Schools’ (AALS) Pincus Award for outstanding contribution to clinical legal education and is currently on the Board of Editors for the Internal Journal of Clinical Legal Education. Before becoming a law professor, he was of counsel at Meckler & Meckler in Cleveland, Ohio, and he started his legal career as National Co-Director for the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council (LSCRRC) in Atlanta, Georgia.
joy@wustl.edu

Colin Starger

Colin Starger

Director of the Legal Data and Design Clinic, Associate Director for Legal Technologies at The Center for the Law of Intellectual Property and Technology, and Professor of Law, University of Baltimore

Before joining the UB Law faculty in 2010, Starger served as an Acting Assistant Professor of Lawyering at New York University School of Law. Starger graduated in 2002 from Columbia University Law School, where he was a recipient of the Jane Marks Murphy Prize (for Clinical Excellence), and a graduation speaker for his J.D. class. Following graduation, Starger clerked for Magistrate Judge Michael Dolinger in the Southern District of New York. From 2003 to 2007, he worked as a Staff Attorney at the Innocence Project at Cardozo Law School. At the Innocence Project, Starger was lead counsel on four DNA exonerations, including one from Oklahoma's death row. Starger is the principal on the SCOTUS Mapping Project, a software-driven effort to map Supreme Court doctrine. He is a member of the New York and Maryland bars.
cstarger@ubalt.edu

Justin Murray

Justin Murray

Associate Professor of Law, New York Law School

Professor Murray teaches criminal law and criminal procedure. His scholarship focuses on criminal procedure, appellate remedies, and post-conviction litigation, with a particular focus on prosecutorial misconduct, the right to counsel, and standards of review. Professor Murray’s academic work has been published in a number of law journals, most recently the Harvard Law Review and the University of Pennsylvania Law Review (forthcoming). He received his J.D. magna cum laude from the Georgetown University Law Center, where he was an Executive Articles Editor for the Georgetown Law Journal. He received his A.B. in Government from Harvard University, where he graduated magna cum laude.
justin.murray@nyls.edu

Ellen Yaroshefsky

Ellen Yaroshefsky

Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development, Howard Lichtenstein Distinguished Professor of Legal Ethics, and Executive Director of the Monroe H. Freedman Institute for the Study of Legal Ethics, Hofstra University

Dean Yaroshefsky teaches a range of ethics courses, organizes symposia and writes and lectures in the field of legal ethics. She also counsels lawyers and law firms and serves as an expert witness. She served as a Commissioner on the New York State Joint Commission on Public Ethics and was the co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Ethics, Gideon and Professionalism Committee of the Criminal Justice Section. She serves on the New York State Committee on Standards of Attorney Conduct, on ethics committees of state and local bar associations and currently co-chairs the Ethics Committee of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. From 1994-2016 she was a Clinical Professor of Law and the Director of the Jacob Burns Center for Ethics in the Practice of Law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York. Prior to joining the Cardozo faculty, she was an attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York and then in private practice.
yaroshef@hofstra.edu

Emily Hughes

Emily Hughes

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor and Bouma Fellow in Law, University of Iowa

Professor Hughes joined the faculty at the University of Iowa College of Law in 2011. Before coming to the College, she was a professor at Washington University in St. Louis School of Law, where she taught criminal law, criminal procedure (investigations and adjudication), and a seminar discussing mitigation and the death penalty. At Washington University she also co-directed the Criminal Justice Clinic, where she supervised law students representing indigent clients facing felony charges in Saint Louis County. She also worked as a Sacks Fellow at Harvard Law School’s Criminal Justice Institute, working with clinical law students in Roxbury and Dorchester representing juvenile and adult clients on misdemeanor and felony charges.
emily-hughes@uiowa.edu

Philip Genty

Philip Genty

Everett B. Birch Innovative Teaching Clinical Professor in Professional Responsibility, Columbia University

Professor Genty joined the Law School's faculty in 1989. He teaches civil procedure and professional responsibility. His research interests are in family law, legal ethics, clinical education, and prisoners’ rights. He has taught and consulted on clinical legal education and legal ethics in central and eastern Europe and Israel. He has developed legal resource materials for incarcerated parents and works with several organizations that assist women who are in prison. He is a member of the Professional Ethics Committee of the New York City Bar Association.
pgenty@law.columbia.edu

Eric Blumenson

Eric Blumenson

Research Professor of Law, Suffolk University

As a research professor, Eric Blumenson specializes in human rights and criminal justice. After graduating from Harvard Law School, he worked in indigent criminal defense before joining the Suffolk faculty to direct its criminal clinic. While at Suffolk, Blumenson has also served as a Fellow of the Open Society Institute, researching police abuse; a Fellow at Harvard's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy; a visiting attorney in the International Criminal Court's chief prosecutor's office; a board member of the ACLU of Massachusetts; a Fulbright scholar in Lahore, Pakistan; a Fellow at the Northeastern University Ethics Institute, and a visiting professor at the University of Witswatersrand's legal clinic in South Africa.
eblumens@suffolk.edu

Tim Casey

Tim Casey

Professor in Residence, Director of STEPPS, California Western School of Law

Professor Casey received his Bachelor’s Degree from Boston College in Economics and Philosophy, a Juris Doctor from the University of California, Hastings College of Law, and an LLM degree from Columbia Law School. Casey started his teaching career at Columbia, where he established a Criminal Practice Clinic and received the Presidential Award for teaching while serving as an Associate in Law. Before moving to San Diego, Casey held an appointment as a Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. He also received a Fulbright award for research and teaching at the Universidad de San Andres in Buenos Aires, Argentina. His research interests include surveillance and civil liberties, problem solving courts, and experiential pedagogy.
tcasey@cwsl.edu

India Thusi

India Thusi

Associate Professor of Law, California Western School of Law

Professor Thusi combines anthropological methodology and legal analysis to examine policing and criminalization at the intersection of justice, gender, and race. Her recent scholarship examines how the policing and criminalization of so-called vices reflect existing racial and gender hierarchies. Her research offers a theoretical framework for assessing whether criminal legal interventions should be adopted, which is sensitive to the harms of mass incarceration. Among many acknowledgements throughout her career, Thusi received a W.E.B. Dubois Fellowship at Harvard University, the Andrew W. Mellon Doctoral Fellowship in the Humanities, and was named a Next Generation African Scholar by the Social Science Research Council. She has published or has forthcoming articles in Northwestern Law Review, Cornell Law Review Online, and the Utah Law Review, amongst others.
ithusi@cwsl.edu